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Who was William Shakespeare?

 
If this sounds like the beginnings of a bad joke or a trick question, it’s not; serious scholars — like my guest tonight, Katherine Chiljan  — have been asking this fundamental question about the true identity of “William Shakespeare, the great Elizabethan playwright,” for the last 400 years!
 
You see, it’s like this:
 
Yes, there was a real “William Shakespeare” — who, according to multiple town records, was born, lived in and died in Stratford-upon-Avon, England, in 1607; the problem is, after hundreds of years of subsequent Shakespeare-the-poet-and-playwright scholarship, there’s no DIRECT evidence that Stratford Shakespeare … was Poet Shakespeare!
 
Looking deeper into this remarkable authorship controversy, one can clearly see from other evidence that, in fact, the association of the Stratford Man with the Great Author, has been a deliberate, carefully planned  HOAX … that’s lasted over 400 years!
 
WHY?
 
Join us, tonight … and find out.
 
 
Richard C. Hoagland

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Trump Administration Suddenly Announces
Return of American Astronauts to the Moon …
Before End of President Trump’s Second Term!

Find Out “Why” Here:

Click on Image for
The Presidential Briefing

Trailerhttps://youtu.be/G7rLvWy8Ih0


 

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Richard’s Items:

 

1.Aliens exist and they are living among us, says first British astronaut into space

 

 

2. ‘What Meghan wants, Meghan gets’: Royal experts on the Sussexes’ decision to quit roles

 

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K

Katherine‘s Items:

Click on Images to Enlarge

1. Six signatures of William Shakspeare of Stratford, the only known examples of his handwriting.

 

 

2. Title page of Hamlet, 1603, showing a hyphen between “Shake” and “speare”.

 

 

3. Opening pages of the 1623 book of Shakespeare plays, called “The First Folio.”

 

 

4. Left / Early image of Shakespeare monument in Stratford-upon-Avon church.

5. Right / Today’s image of Shakespeare monument in Stratford-upon-Avon church.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Cover of Katherine’s book, Shakespeare Suppressed, featuring portrait of Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford —  the real “Shakespeare.”

 

 

7-Katherine Chiljan – Origins of the Pen Name, “William Shakespeare”

 

 

8- Available at Amazon:

Shakespeare Suppressed: the Uncensored Truth about Shakespeare and his Works – 2nd edition (2016) (Click on Cover to Buy)

 and shakespearesuppressed.com

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K

Katherine Chiljan

shakespearesuppressed.com
doubtaboutwill.org
shakespeareoxfordfellowship.org

Katherine Chiljan is an independent scholar who has studied the Shakespeare authorship question for over 30 years. A graduate of U.C.L.A. (B.A. History), Chiljan became interested in the controversy when Charlton Ogburn, author of The Mysterious William Shakespeare (1984), appeared in a TV debate with a Shakespeare professor. She then started doing her own research, eventually publishing two anthologies about the 17th Earl of Oxford, and acting as editor of the Shakespeare-Oxford Newsletter. 

In 2003, she debated English professors on the topic at the Smithsonian Institution.

Chiljan was inspired to write Shakespeare Suppressed: The Uncensored Truth About Shakespeare and His Works (2011, reprinted 2016) after hearing a prominent English professor insult doubters of the traditional Shakespeare on national television. The book took almost 7 years to complete and earned her an award for distinguished scholarship from Concordia University, Portland, OR, in April 2012. The book was reprinted in 2016. She was one of the contributors to Contested Year (2016), which uncovered shoddy scholarship in a recent book about King Lear by a prominent Shakespeare professor.

 

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4 Comments so far:

  1. Geoff says:

    I find it more than a bit odd that Katherine can’t remember where her very own debate was held at the Smithsonian.  Anyone that has (including myself, several times) certainly recalls each and every building visited.  If I would have had an opportunity to debate any subject, a recollection of the building that it was held in would certainly be immediately recalled.  I fear that I’m sensing significant BS being layed out here.

    • Thea says:

      Hi Geoff, re: “Anyone that has (including myself, several times) certainly recalls each and every building visited.”

      I myself do not find it odd…because even tho I am an artist, I TRACK PEOPLE more than buildings, in fact, I hardly remember buildings at all, …Secondly, when there is the pressure of speaking to a large audience, physiologically, the brain constricts blood flow…same reason why students suddenly can’t remember something on an exam when they’ve studied it for weeks. We are not all focused in the same way…nor do we all have the same response to handling stress. I am sure…there are things that I recall that you most likely never notice. And I’ll wager, that if you pick anyone at random and ask them to describe the building they were in one time…even last week…let alone years ago…would fumble. Kynthea

  2. H P WHITFIELD says:

    interesting subject, because a  story is carried forward, repeated, and presented as a real history, but the reality of the times was that there was not the level of public record as may be imagined today. The lack of surviving records does not inform us of who, what and when was the reality, so it is important to clearly say what is at best speculation, and what is evidence based opinion.
    such an example is that the early british were celts, now taken for granted, but this is 18th century invention copied and repeated so that it is accepted as a fact, so a falsehood can become long lived, and a established belief.

  3. Tim says:

    De Vere. 
    There was a epitaph discovered at Westminster Abbey at Shakey’s tomb that attributes the works to the above name behind the Nom de Plume.
    Cant wait to listen.  My mother’s paternal side was descended from the de Vere family.

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